Guidelines
CIBSE
Lighting Guide 10: Daylighting - A Guide for Designers: Lighting for the Built Environment
Society of Light and Lighting SLL LG10 (2014)
In designing windows for the provision of daylight it is important to avoid causing problems with lare, noise intrusion, summertime overheating and excessive use of energy. read more

Lighting Guide 10: Daylighting – A Guide for Designers: Lighting for the Built Environment (SLL LG10)

This guide takes the reader through the process of designing for daylighting, addressing the issues of aesthetics and building physics that lie at the heart of the discipline of architecture. This requires architects to understand the basic aspects of the engineering of light, and engineers to have a grasp of aesthetics. The format of the guide parallels the design process, beginning with outline considerations of form and orientation and leading on to the more detailed aspects of designing the building envelope to admit or to filter natural light through different shading systems. It also deals with the multitude of different visualisation techniques that allow the design team to explore the appearance of design solutions. In addition, it provides a guide to more detailed resource material.

The document has been written primarily for use when new design work is to be undertaken. However, much of the guidance will be applicable to refurbishment projects. The guidance in this document is written primarily for buildings located within the UK, and will be most applicable to projects in northern hemisphere temperate climates. However, the principles are universal, and can be applied to other locations if the appropriate weather data is used and local standards and regulations are respected

This edition of LG10 supersedes the previous edition, CIBSE Lighting Guide LG10: Daylighting and window design, which was published in 1999, and which is now withdrawn.

 

Contents:

Introduction

1 Daylighting: an overview

1.1 The need for good daylighting in buildings

1.2 Basic principles

 2 Initial design considerations

2.1 Building orientation, siting and massing

2.2 Architectural style and construction

2.3 Shading and sunlight

2.4 Internal space planning

2.5 Views in and out

2.6 Ventilation strategy

2.7 Costs

 3 Detailed design considerations

3.1 Working with diffuse daylight

3.2 Solar shading design

3.3 Glazing materials

3.4 Daylight calculations

3.5 Integration of electric lighting and daylight

3.6 Other detailed design considerations

4 Visualisation

4.1 Sketches

4.2 Scale models

4.3 Full scale models and mock-ups

4.4 Computer-based visualisation

Appendices

References

http://www.cibse.org/Knowledge/CIBSE-LG/Lighting-Guide-10-Daylighting-a-Guide-for-Designer

ISBN: 978 1 906846 48 0

 

NOTE:

A Corrigendum in the form of a replacement page 77 was issued in December 2014 to correct an issue with the Sunpath diagram. This has been corrected in the downloadable pdf and will be supplied to purchasers of the hard copy but can also be downloaded separately here.


Lighting Guide 07: Office Lighting
Society of Light and Lighting SLL LG7 (2005)
Lighting Guide 7: office lighting covers all aspects of the lighting of offices, from board room through general offices to the post room. It also includes guidance on lighting for offices spaces where display screen equipment is in use. read more

Lighting Guide 7: office lighting covers all aspects of the lighting of offices, from board room through general offices to the post room. It also includes guidance on lighting for offices spaces where display screen equipment is in use.

This effectively replaces Lighting Guide 3 as the relevant guidance for office buildings. However, there are many other buildings where display screen equipment is used, that Lighting Guide 3(now out of print) provides useful guidance for such applications.

Lighting Guide 7 gives advice on the design and operation of office lighting schemes and installations for all users of office buildings and associated areas. The Guide is aimed at, and will be useful to, lighting specifiers, designers, equipment providers, contractors, users, maintainers, letting agents and developers.

Following an introduction which sets the scene in terms of legislation, standards and good practice, sections cover: the design process; the design brief and information to be provided; building types; design criteria; design options for electric lighting (including direct, indirect and combined direct/indirect lighting); and design options for daylighting. An extensive final section discusses detailed room design information for primary office spaces, secondary office spaces, circulation areas and back-of-house areas.

An appendix deals with lighting for planting, especially in atria. The volume includes an extensive glossary and a comprehensive index. This Guide makes use of several relevant international, European and British Standards and is a companion to the Code for Lighting also published by the Society. The declaration of Conformity originally published in connection with lighting Guide 3 has been updated slightly to make it suitable for use with Lighting Guide 7, and can be downloaded here.

An Addendum to LG7 has been produced (in July 2012) to reflect changes made to the European Standard for Indoor Workplaces in 2011 (BS EN 12464-1) and in accordance with the SLL Code for Lighting 2012.

http://www.cibse.org/knowledge/cibse-lg/lighting-guide-07-office-lighting

ISBN: 9781903287521


Lighting Guide 5: Lighting for Education
Society of Light and Lighting SLL LG5 (2011)
Learning, whether by discussion, interaction, practical application or formal lecture, requires sufficient light to enable the pupils to see the visible information presented around them. Whether in a primary school classroom or a professional lecture theatre, whether for young or old, the quality of light in the learning environment read more

Learning, whether by discussion, interaction, practical application or formal lecture, requires sufficient light to enable the pupils to see the visible information presented around them. Whether in a primary school classroom or a professional lecture theatre, whether for young or old, the quality of light in the learning environment will directly affect our learning experience and indeed our motivation to learn.

Lighting Guide LG5: Lighting for education offers guidance on the lighting of all educational spaces including lecture theatres, teaching rooms, conference rooms, special-purpose rooms (such as gymnasia, art rooms and dance studios), multi-purpose rooms etc. In addition to providing guidance on the lighting equipment and its positioning, LG5 considers other important factors such as the decoration and finishes of rooms, sightlines, positioning of lighting controls and access doors, all of which need to be taken into account from the earliest stages of the planning process.

Contents include:

  • components of lighting design;
  • objectives and constraints;
  • lighting for visual function;
  • lighting for visual amenity;
  • lighting and architectural integration;
  • lighting and energy efficiency;
  • maintenance;
  • lighting costs;
  • lighting for health;
  • natural lighting;
  • electric lighting;
  • lighting the interior space;
  • daylighting;
  • lighting for particular applications;
  • general performance requirements for learning spaces;
  • areas with display screen equipment;
  • laboratories, workshops and other practical learning spaces;
  • sports halls and gymnasia;
  • general purpose halls, drama and dance studios;
  • lighting for whiteboards and projection screens;
  • lighting for pupils with visual and hearing impairments;
  • exterior lighting;
  • emergency lighting;
  • lighting and energy efficiency;
  • lighting maintenance;
  • management of lecture and conference spaces;
  • projection rooms and booths;
  • lighting costs;
  • equipment;
  • glossary of lighting terms.

http://www.cibse.org/knowledge/cibse-lg/lighting-guide-05-lighting-for-education

ISBN: 9781906846176


SLL Code for Lighting
Society of Light and Lighting (2012)
For many years, the IES Code for Lighting was the de facto standard for lighting provision in the United Kingdom. However, in 2002, the Committee for European Standardisation (CEN) took on the task of providing lighting recommendations, and, read more

For many years, the IES Code for Lighting was the de facto standard for lighting provision in the United Kingdom. However, in 2002, the Committee for European Standardisation (CEN) took on the task of providing lighting recommendations, and, since then the British Standards Institution has adopted the CEN recommendations for use in the United Kingdom. As a result, there are now a range of British Standards that specify the quantitative lighting requirements for a wide range of applications. Consequently, the role of the SLL Code for Lighting has shifted from being the only source for quantitative lighting recommendations to being a guide on how to interpret the British Standard recommendations and how to implement them in practice.

This edition of the SLL Code for Lighting takes the changes in lighting guidance a step further by a process of separation and concentration. The separation involves moving the details of vision, lighting technology and lighting applications into another publication, the SLL Lighting Handbook. The concentration occurs because this SLL Code for Lighting provides information on three fundamental matters of relevance to lighting practice. These matters are:

  • A summary of what is known about the effects of lighting on task performance, behaviour, safety, perception and health as well as its financial and environmental costs.
  • A compendium of all the lighting recommendations relevant to the United Kingdom with suggestions as to how these should be interpreted. This compendium covers recommendations for both interior and exterior lighting in normal conditions.
  • A detailed description of all the calculations required for quantitative lighting design. While it is a fact that, today, most lighting calculations are done using software that simply implements the fundamental calculations described here, without knowledge of these calculations, it is diffi cult to assess the meaning and merit of the results produced by software.

First published in 1936, the Code for Lighting was published in printed form until 1994.  In 2002 the Code was published as a CD for the first time and the following editions in 2004, 2006 and 2009 were produced purely in CD format.  This 2012 edition reverts back to hard copy (and as a pdf), complimented by the SLL Lighting Handbook.

Contents
Chapter 1: The balance of lighting
Chapter 2: Indoor workplaces
Chapter 3: Outdoor workplaces
Chapter 4: Road lighting
Chapter 5: Daylight
Chapter 6: Energy
Chapter 7: Construction (Design and Management) Regulations
Chapter 8: Basic energy and light
Chapter 9: Luminous flux, intensity, illuminance, luminance and their interrelationships
Chapter 10: Direct lighting
Chapter 11: Indirect lighting
Chapter 12: Photometric datasheets
Chapter 13: Indoor lighting calculations
Chapter: 14 Outdoor lighting calculations
Chapter 15: Measurement of lighting installations and interpreting the results
Chapter 16: Colour
Chapter 17: Daylight calculations
Chapter 18: Predicting maintenance factor
Chapter 19: Glossary
Chapter 20: Bibliography

http://www.cibse.org/knowledge/cibse-lg/sll-code-for-lighting

ISBN: 978 1 906846 21 3


SLL Lighting Handbook
Society of Light and Lighting (2012)
The SLL Lighting Handbook has been written to forge a link between the Society's existing major publications; the SLL Code for Lighting (which offers recommendations on lighting for a wide range of applications) and the SLL Lighting Guides read more

The SLL Lighting Handbook has been written to forge a link between the Society’s existing major publications; the SLL Code for Lighting (which offers recommendations on lighting for a wide range of applications) and the SLL Lighting Guides (which provide detailed guidance on specific lighting applications).

The SLL Lighting Handbook is designed to be complementary to the SLL Code for Lighting but to go beyond it in terms of applications and background information without getting into the fine detail of the Lighting Guides.

The Handbook is intended to be the first-stop for anyone seeking information on lighting. It is aimed not just at lighting practitioners but also at lighting specifiers and students of lighting. For all three groups it is comprehensive, up-to-date and easily understandable. The contents summarise the fundamentals of light and vision, the technology of lighting and guidance on a wide range of applications, both interior and exterior.

Contents

PART 1: FUNDAMENTALS
Chapter 1: Light
Chapter 2: Vision

PART 2: TECHNOLOGY
Chapter 3: Light Sources
Chapter 4: Luminaires
Chapter 5: Electrics

PART 3: APPLICATIONS
Chapter 6: Lighting design
Chapter 7: Daylighting
Chapter 8: Emergency lighting
Chapter 9: Office lighting
Chapter 10: Industrial lighting
Chapter 11: Lighting for educational premises
Chapter 12: Retail lighting
Chapter 13: Lighting for museums and art galleries
Chapter 14: Lighting for hospitals
Chapter 15: Quasi-domestic lighting
Chapter 16: Road Lighting
Chapter 17: Exterior workplace lighting
Chapter 18: Security lighting
Chapter 19: Sports lighting
Chapter 20. Lighting Performance Verification
Chapter 21: Lighting Maintenance
Chapter 22: On the horizon
Chapter 23: Bibliography

http://www.cibse.org/knowledge/cibse-lg/sll-lighting-handbook

ISBN: 9781906846022


Lighting Guide 11: Surface Reflectance and Colour
Society of Light and Lighting SLL LG11 (2001)
The Society of Light and Lighting has published a guide to surface reflectance and colour which enables lighting designers to assess much more accurately than hitherto the reflectances of the various... read more

The Society of Light and Lighting has published a guide to surface reflectance and colour which enables lighting designers to assess much more accurately than hitherto the reflectances of the various surfaces in the space to be lit.

Surface reflectance is an important factor in lighting calculations, yet accurate information is rarely available. This new Guide includes specially printed and calibrated colour sample cards to enable designers to assess the reflectances of the various room surfaces quickly and accurately.

This publication will therefore be of use to a wide range of professionals including architects, interior designers, lighting consultants, contractors and facilities managers.

This publication has been produced by the Society of Light and Lighting in conjunction with the National Physical Laboratory as part of the work of the NPL Optical Radiation Measurement Club. Measurements and calibration of the sample cards were carried out by NPL.

 

Contents

1 Introduction
2 Light reflecting properties of surfaces
3 Light reflecting properties of building materials
3.1 Reflectance of building materials
3.2 Colour of building materials
3.3 Surface finish of building materials
3.4 Surface deterioration and maintenance
3.5 Depreciation of luminaire performance
4 Surface colour specification
4.1 Munsell system
4.2 Natural Colour System
4.3 DIN system
4.4 BS 5252: 1976: Framework for colour co-ordination for building purposes
4.5 RAL design system
5 Measurement of reflectance and colour
5.1 Measurement using a spectrophotometer
5.2 Measurement using a calorimeter
5.3 Measurement using luminance and Illuminance meters
5.4 Field measurements using the reflectance sample card
5.5 Visual assessment
6 Reflectance and colour standards
7 Surface appearance
8 Explanation of terms
References
Reflectance sample card description

http://www.cibse.org/knowledge/cibse-lg/lighting-guide-11-surface-reflectance-colour

ISBN: 978-1903287149


IES
Approved Method: IES Spatial Daylight Autonomy (sDA) and Annual Sunlight Exposure (ASE)
LM-83-12 (2013)
The metrics described in this document are intended to be applicable to common workplace environments. They read more

The metrics described in this document are intended to be applicable to common workplace environments. They are based on an analysis of open offices, classrooms, meeting rooms, multi-purpose rooms, and service areas in libraries and lobbies, and so are most applicable to areas with similar visual tasks. These metrics are neither counter to, nor do they supersede, IES task lighting criteria for these space types. These metrics do not directly address energy consumption, as electric lighting management is highly variable.

The area of analysis for these metrics is ideally a coherent “space”, defined by opaque walls and access to daylight through at least one wall or ceiling surface. It is also possible to apply these metrics to the “regularly occupied” floor area of a building, or some part of a building, such as one floor plate. It is important to specify the “area of analysis” to which the percentages apply.

These metrics were derived from a study of daylit spaces in the continental United States, and thus are most applicable to similar latitudes and cultures.

Contents
Foreword
Introduction
Scope
Spatial Daylight Autonomy
sDA – Introduction
sDA – Climatic Modeling Methodology
sDA – Simulation Output Formats
Annual Sunlight Exposure (ASE)
ASE – Introduction
ASE – Building 3D Modeling Details
ASE – Climatic Modeling Methodology
ASE – Simulation Output Formats
Glossary
References

http://www.ies.org/store/product/approved-method-ies-spatial-daylight-autonomy-sda-and-annual-sunlight-exposure-ase-1287.cfm

ISBN: 978-0-87995-272-3


Recommended Practice for Daylighting Buildings
RP-5-13 (2013)
This Recommended Practice conveniently gathers the basic data and techniques which help those concerned with the design of buildings and lighting systems understand read more

This Recommended Practice conveniently gathers the basic data and techniques which help those concerned with the design of buildings and lighting systems understand and appreciate the opportunities and constraints inherent in daylighting.  Daylighted buildings offer significant benefits that include visual and thermal comfort, occupant satisfaction, a connection to the outdoor environment, and reduced energy consumption, maintenance costs, and greenhouse gas emissions.

Daylighting can result in significant electric lighting reduction in commercial buildings – 40% or more in side-lighted daylight zones and more than 50% is top-lighted daylight zones.
The challenges of daylighting include glare, unwanted solar heat gain, the control of electric lighting, shading systems and coordination of the multiple disciplines affecting daylighting performance from initial planning to actual occupancy.

In addition RP-5-13 also addresses daylight delivery methods and fenestration properties of various glazing systems, shading techniques, and control strategies.  Measurements and daylight performance simulation tools are also described.

Contents
Introduction
Daylighting Benefits
Daylighting Challenges
Daylighting Sources
Standard Sky Luminance Distributions
Daylight Characteristics
Daylighting Design
Daylight Delivery Methods
Fenestration Technologies
Glazing Systems
Shading Systems
Frame Systems
Electric Lighting Integration
Electric Lighting Controls
Daylight Performance Simulation and Design Tools
References

http://www.ies.org/store/product/recommended-practice-for-daylighting-buildings-1305.cfm

ISBN: 978-0-87995-281-5


IES Seminar: Daylighting - Student Materials
SEM-6-12
Participants will be able to… read more

Participants will be able to…

  • Identify daylighting as a keystone strategy of sustainable design
  • Identify the components of daylighting in terms of spectrum, usage, US legislation, and the creative process used in building design
  • Analyze how effective daylighting utilizes non-lighting components of the total building system
  • Identify and compare daylight metrics used in analyzing and designing daylight systems

CONTENTS
BASIC CONCEPTS
SOURCE
STRATEGIES
VIEW
RULES-OF-THUMB
A GLAZING PRIMER
SUN CONTROL
CONTROLS & INTEGRATION
DAYLIGHT MODELING
METRICS

http://www.ies.org/store/product/ies-seminar-daylighting-student-materials-1260.cfm

ISBN: 978-0-87995-246-4


OTHER
Lighting design for schools
Building Bulletin 90
The best school environments give an impression of liveliness, with attractive spaces and a general feeling of pleasantness which it is difficult to define. read more

The best school environments give an impression of liveliness, with attractive spaces and a general feeling of pleasantness which it is difficult to define. There can be no doubt that in these cases the surroundings contribute to the happiness and well-being of teachers and pupils, and that lighting plays a significant if not the leading role. Lighting (both natural and electric) will be recognised as an essential contribution if it stems from and encourages the fulfilment of school activities.

The aim of good lighting rather than being a purely formal exercise to provide enough illumination to enable building users to go about their tasks safely and comfortably, though this must always be a prime aim, is to create a pleasant environment which enhances the building form and is in sympathy with the architectural intention.

Contents
1. Introduction
2. Components of lighting design
3. Lighting options
4. Lighting design guidance
4.1 Daylighting
4.2 Electric Lighting
4.3 Integrated daylight and electric light
4.4 Aids to lighting design
5. Lighting for particular applications
6. Check-list for lighting design
Appendices

http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/b/bb90%20lighting%20design%20for%20schools%20feb%202008.pdf


EFA Daylight Design Guide
Education Funding Agency
Good quality daylight within the learning environment is essential. The aim of the daylight design should be to ensure sufficient levels of balanced glare-free light to all teaching spaces. read more

Good quality daylight within the learning environment is essential. The aim of the daylight design should be to ensure sufficient levels of balanced glare-free light to all teaching spaces. Historically daylight factors have been used to determine  the quantity of light available within a room. However in  practice this has led to a blinds down lights on situation.  This is largely due to the simple overcast sky model used in the daylight factor calculation.  What is required is a numerical approach which supports  the principles of good daylight design and good architectural design. Climate Based Daylight Modelling  (CBDM) aims to provide the required numerical approach to support good design.

1. Introduction
2. Lighting metrics: DA and UDI figures
3. The Baseline Designs
4. Surface Colours and Light Reflectances

http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/e/efa%20daylight%20design%20guide-rev02%20january%202014.pdf